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Total Productive Maintenance (TPM/TPR) Tips - Submit a Tip (Login Required)


Tip #36  Be sure and conduct a safety walk through before the start of any Basic Equipment Care (BEC) workshop.  Also conduct a safety and lock out review before hitting the floor each day. - (Greg Folts, Marshall Institute Inc.)
Tip #35  Cleaning is inspection! With over 17 years of TPM/TPR implementation experience, it still amazes me how effective cleaning is at exposing defects. I have learned that if I see dirt, I will find defects when we clean.- Greg Folts, President, Marshall Institute - (Greg Folts, Marshall Institute Inc.)
Tip #34  5S is a great preparation activity for Total Productive Maintenance (TPM/TPR). It is fairly easy to implement and generally does not require a lot of maintenance resources. It can help show visible results and demonstrate that change is possible within the current environment. - (Greg Folts, Marshall Institute Inc.)
Tip #33  Brainstorming minor stoppages (less than 10 minutes in duration) with the various operators helps to identify those that need to be tracked and also helps to win the operators' commitment to tracking them in order to remove the recurring nuisances. A checklist on a clipboard with a pencil next to the machine can aid the operator in tracking by marking tick marks for each occurrence. Then, calculating the Mean Time Between Failure (MTBF) can help identify the real culprits and monitor the effectiveness of any solutions.
Tip #32  When calculating a business case, consider the cost of deferring production to a later date. Wages, energy consumption, equipment wear, and overhead are all increased when the product is not produced at the scheduled time.
Tip #31  Quantify the improvements in your Total Productive Maintenance (TPM/TPR) process by documenting improvements in parts cost, equipment efficiency, quality, and reduced oil consumption. Partner with safety and environmental programs by demonstrating the impact of Total Productive Maintenance (TPM/TPR) on safety and the environment - (Greg Folts, Marshall Institute Inc.)
Tip #30  When you provide training to the general workforce, especially the introductory stuff, take it to them on their own turf. Go to them on their shift and make it as convenient for them as possible. When we always bring them in on off time or have them stay over after working all night it works against our best efforts of building that seamless team required for true lasting Total Productive Maintenance (TPM/TPR) success.
Tip #29  Communication is said to be the glue that binds an organization together and it follows that it is an essential part of getting total Total Productive Maintenance (TPM/TPR) buy in from the general workforce. Do not assume that several announcements and a note on the notice board is sufficient to get the story out. At Marshall Institute we say to communicate seven times and seven ways but that does not mean seven months apart. Develop and implement a robust communication plan and check to see if the total target audience has received the unfiltered message. If you want to know if your message is getting out clearly why not ask the most obscure person on the night shift is he or she has the message? The day shift is easy but how about the rest of the folks?
Tip #28  For some maintenance tactics (e.g. Total Productive Maintenance (TPM/TPR) observations, PdM vibration monitoring), direct access to moving equipment is required. This may require changes to equipment guarding. It may be possible to use expanded metal to allow observation of the equipment, while still guarding the equipment. Similarly access for vibration monitoring sensors might be achieved through the use of a suitably sized tube. To simplify removing guards to allow access when the equipment is shutdown and locked out, a standard sized fastener could be held captive to the guard and used to hold the guards in place. To minimize the number of fasteners used to allow quick removal and re-installation, locating pins or hinges (especially those that split into two) can be used with the fasteners.
Tip #27  Create an audit system to ensure your Total Productive Maintenance (TPM/TPR) program is effective. - (James Freds, Advanced Filtration Systems Inc.)
Tip #26  When programs do not align with organization’s goals, they may receive support in the beginning, but if they don’t provide direct value to helping the company meet Total Productive Maintenance (TPM/TPR) goals and objectives, it will only be a matter of time before support and resources dry up.
Tip #25  The most effective TPM implementations are those that integrate well into the organization. The problem is that many programs never quite become part of the organization.
Tip #24  Breakdowns not only prevent you from delivering goods on time, but they add expense to your operational costs. You can keep costs down by being proactive instead of waiting for a failure.
Tip #23  By distributing the tasks and responsibilities around, you not only become more flexible and able to respond to changes more quickly, but you involve more people in the improvement process. Productivity comes from working smarter, not harder. That is the difference between effectiveness and efficiency. You can be effective without being efficient, but, the key to productivity is to do both.
Tip #22  Total Productive Maintenance (TPM/TPR) gives you a system to become more proactive. It encourages planning ahead instead of waiting for failure to arrive. Planned maintenance not only prevents expensive failures, but is far more economical.
Tip #21  Maintenance Prevention doesn't mean eliminating maintenance, it means eliminating costly maintenance by involving operators, maintenance craftsmen and others in activities that prevent equipment from breaking down. This means detecting problems while they are small and manageable.
Tip #20  Develop internal champions for the change process. These “change agents” will make the difference in your implementation, by owning the change. Training, development, and coaching will take these employees to new personal levels and take your Total Productive Maintenance (TPM/TPR) process to the new heights.
Tip #19  The equipment operator can be a valuable resource. They are at the machine far more than maintenance personnel, therefore they are an important resource to detect changes in conditions and perform some of the simpler maintenance tasks such as lubricating, tightening of fasteners, and inspecting for a failure.
Tip #18  Develop a structured root cause analysis approach. Improvement Teams need the structure and process to be effective. We use the Define, Measure, Analyze, Improve, and Control method from Six Sigma in our root cause process.
Tip #17  Early Equipment Management (EEM) is a technique for stopping maintenance related issues at the source. One of the most significant impacts we can have on spare parts, maintenance cost, and operations cost starts at the equipment design and purchase.
Tip #16  Skill transfer is a critical step in the development of operator based inspection. Before transferring a task from maintenance to operations, we must first transfer the skills!!!
Tip #15  5 S is a great preparation activity for Total Productive Maintenance (TPM/TPR). It is fairly easy to implement and generally does not require a lot of maintenance resources. It can help show visible results and demonstrate that change is possible with in the current environment.
Tip #14  Use a root cause analysis process to ensure your Equipment Improvement Teams success. Teams often struggle to solve problems, without the use of a structured problem solving approach. Marshall Institute utilizes the DMAIC (Define, Measure, Analyze, Improve, Control) process to bring structure to the process. This process comes from Six Sigma and is a proven problem solving model.
Tip #13  Partner with other local businesses that are implementing Total Productive Maintenance (TPM/TPR). By networking, your organization can share best practices, share training costs, benchmark with other companies, and reward participation in the Total Productive Maintenance (TPM/TPR) process. This low cost resource can provide great returns!!!
Tip #12  Conduct a team report out at the end of your Autonomous Care events. The team gets a chance to discuss the improvements implemented, as well as discuss support needed to continue improving. Do not let the report outs take longer than 1 hour, and include a visit to the equipment.
Tip #11  Network with other Total Productive Maintenance (TPM/TPR) professionals. Conferences, seminars, and user forums are all good methods of keeping in touch. Conduct a team report out at the end of your Autonomous Care events. The team gets a chance to discuss the improvements implemented, as well as discuss support needed to continue improving. Do not let the report outs take longer than 1 hour, and include a visit to the equipment.
Tip #10  When beginning a Total Productive Maintenance (TPM/TPR) implementation, calculate a business case for the initiative. Develop a picture of cost savings, production improvements, and intangible benefits. Understanding these benefits helps with sustaining and justifying the efforts.
Tip #9  When implementing Total Productive Maintenance (TPM/TPR) find small ways to demonstrate that change is possible. Equipment improvement teams, autonomous care workshops, root cause analysis, and breakthrough teams can all be used to demonstrate "quick wins".
Tip #8  When applying visual controls: Clear packaging tape placed over equipment labels helps with adhesion and protection in harsh industrial environments.
Tip #7  Create a vision for the change desired with the Total Productive Maintenance (TPM/TPR)process. Once your key leaders agree on the vision, you can start to communicate the vision to the employees. Tie all Total Productive Maintenance (TPM/TPR) activities with the vision. Ask: How does this action support the vision?
Tip #6  Visual Controls are used to reinforce standards and to help the operator tell "normal from abnormal".
Tip #5  Standards are the key to accountability and the elimination of variation. The standard defines the expectation so the quality of the task can be audited and encouraged.
Tip #4  Always begin your Total Productive Maintenance (TPM/TPR) implementation with an assessment of your current status. The assessment will establish a baseline, understanding of the current environment, and a basis for future audits.
Tip #3  Always build a strong support system for your Total Productive Maintenance (TPM/TPR) process. Long term success and sustainability requires a broad support structure. Ensure that if one key supporter for the process leaves, your process will not fail.
Tip #2  Brainstorming minor stoppages (less than 10 minutes in duration) with the various operators helps to identify those that need to be tracked but also helps to win their commitment to tracking them in order to remove the recurring nuisances. A checklist on a clipboard with a pencil next to the machine can aid the operator in tracking by marking tick marks for each occurrence. Then calculating the Mean Time Between Failure (MTBF) can help identify the real culprits and monitor the effectiveness of any solutions.
Tip #1  Keep in contact with the Total Productive Maintenance (TPM/TPR) professionals at Marshall Institute. We are in facilities from Atlanta to Russia assisting with implementation efforts. Call us with your questions, comments, or to share your latest success with Total Productive Maintenance (TPM/TPR). We love to hear from the field!!!

Updated November 1, 2010

Planning and Scheduling (MPS) Tips - Submit a Tip (Login Required)


Tip #19  There are 3 key partnerships that must be formed in order to make the Planning & Scheduling improvement efforts more effective. These partnerships are leveraged by good working relations and communication between Operations, Parts, and Maintenance. These three departments are the cornerstones of a successful planning and scheduling process.One effective tactic to build better relationships and communication is to include your production partner in the weekly maintenance scheduling meetings. They can provide assistance in work prioritization and scheduling machine downtime so maintenance work can be performed.Build relationships, ask for people's professional opinion, and communicate openly about what you want to achieve. If you make people feel valuable, more often than not, they will help offer more support than you asked for. - (Tracy Strawn, Marshall Institute Inc.)
Tip #18  Planning and scheduling is one component of a total maintenance program that can yield tremendous improvements in the productivity of maintenance personnel. Once the preliminary requirements for planning and scheduling are in place, the program can be implemented without any increase in head count.
Tip #17  When planners are performing jobsite visits to review upcoming work, in addition to PPE, they should always carry the following: - Multi-tool - Flashlight (Small Maglite) - Rag for cleaning off equipment so you can see the problem. (Keeps your hands cleaner to prevent your planning checklist from getting so dirty)
Tip #16  Ensure that the area you are staging your kitted parts in is secure! Otherwise your kits may be tampered with and parts removed without your knowledge, then the kit will not be as effective when it is taken to be used on the job site.
Tip #15  Can your DIN (Do It Now Squad) be contacted easily? Remember, machinery is down, so insure this squad has a 2 way radio, cell phone, etc. so they can be reached as quickly as possible. If they are traveling long distances, transportation may be needed such as a bicycle or motorized scooter to get to the machine quickly and minimize downtime. - (Alan Warmack, Marshall Institute Inc.)
Tip #14  Is Upper Management committed to the process? Your plant should have a steering committee consisting of the plant manager, the production manager, and the maintenance manager, (at minimum) that meets at least quarterly to review the maintenance improvement processes that you are trying to sustain. These meetings should provide maintenance and their production partners the opportunity to show their progress from the previous quarter, plans for the coming quarter, and a forum to present obstacles that the steering committee might help remove or resolve. This process insures that Upper Management continues to show commitment and drive the process forward.
Tip #13  Is your PM/PdM system dynamic? It is critical that you review your system on a regular basis, reviewing needed changes to tasks, frequency, etc. To help in the review process, start by reviewing your equipment histories, looking for repairs and breakdowns that repeat often. Then look at your PM and determine if there is a task that should find and prevent this problem. You may need to add or edit the tasks, or change your frequency, to identify the problem sooner to enable you to plan and schedule the repair.
Tip #12  Is your planner properly skilled to facilitate the scheduling meetings? Do they know the preparations that should be taken to be ready for the scheduling meeting? Planner training is critical if they are to be expected to perform in an effective manner.
Tip #11  Establish good Bill Of Materials for your standard jobs and PMs.
Tip #10  Balance your workloads for PM’s, PdM’s, and corrective repairs from the backlog. Establish realistic work levels in your weekly scheduling meetings so that emergency work does not impact this work.
Tip #9  Review your database looking for repetitive events. Find the frequency of the events and the cause, to drive out the problem with permanent fixes through Root Cause Failure Analysis.
Tip #8  Insure that your planners are building standard job packages for repetitive work. This will free up their time so they are not rebuilding these jobs each time they repeat.
Tip #7  Include your Production partner in the weekly maintenance scheduling meetings. They can provide assistance in prioritization of the work, and the scheduling of the machinery to be down for the work to be performed.
Tip #6  There are 3 key Partnerships that must be formed in order to make the Planning & Scheduling improvement efforts more effective. These partnerships include good working relations and communications with Operations, Parts, and Maintenance cornerstones of a successful Planning Implementation process.
Tip #5  Under NO circumstances should PM/ PdM crews be pulled off to work on unplanned work! They are the key to identifying problems so they can be corrected before they break, driving down your unplanned work. If resources are needed, pull them from the routine work being performed or some other source
Tip #4  “Rebuild Boxes” provide an excellent way of providing “Point of Service” parts to a Planned work crew when rebuilding a piece of equipment. This box should contain all the parts required to rebuild that equipment, reducing the travel time in search of parts. These parts boxes can be placed in stock when not being used, with a set quantity of parts. When they are pulled to be used, the parts should be replenished against the rebuild work order before entering being placed back in the parts system, insuring that the quantities used on the rebuild are charged to that specific equipment.
Tip #3  Does your CMMS system have the capability of adding “Functional Groups”? This function can be very helpful in grouping multiple pieces of equipment for the sake of pulling costs, by line, as an example to compare one line of equipment’s maintenance costs, breakdowns, etc., against another. It should also allow you to pull all active work orders against that list. This enables you to quickly pull all work on a line that went down and see if there are other opportunities for equipment repairs while the line is down.
Tip #2  Are you utilizing your DIN (Do It Now) squads effectively? Are they sitting in the break rooms when not on a breakdown? They can handle many of the small, non-critical jobs around the plant. Give them these jobs such as picture hanging, changing lights bulbs, and others they can stop easily and return to later with no adverse effects. This will free up your Planned work crews to handle the more detailed and complex jobs.
Tip #1  Prioritize your work request as they enter the system. Set up a matrix using categories from 10-1 for each equipment category and each work classification. For example, Utilities would be a 10 in the equipment category and Breakdown would be a 10 in the work class. Multiplied, they would equal 100, meaning a breakdown to this equipment takes top priority due to taking the entire plant down. If this type matrix is used, it provides an effective decision making tool on which worked takes place first, second, etc.

Updated November 1, 2010

Preventive/Predictive Maintenance - Submit a Tip (Login Required)


Tip #8  Rather than risk the expense and effort (e.g. equipment, training) required to implement predictive maintenance technologies, try a small pilot project using an outside contractor. With the lower initial expense and the capabilities of an experienced contractor (you did do your homework on checking out the contractor didn't you?), the likelihood of success is much higher. The program can be expanded on an incremental basis. If eventually there is sufficient work to make it worthwhile to do it in-house, justification is easier if the program has already proven itself.
Tip #7  To help change the attitude of maintenance being a "necessary evil" to a value added part of the process, post your Thermographic Analysis pictures on the bulletin boards on internal websites within your company. In most cases no one knows maintenance is providing this service except maintenance and maybe an engineer. The colors of the thermographic analysis pictures will certainly grab peoples attention.
Tip #6  Is there a Predictive tool available to allow the condition of your Production equipment to be monitored while running? PM’s can be invasive, requiring the equipment to be taken down for inspection. There are many tools available at reasonable costs that allow you to inspect the machine while running, and actually require that the machine is running to perform the inspection.
Tip #5  Use your local supplier of oils and lubricants for oil analysis. Reputable vendors will many times offer this value added service at no cost to their customers. They can also come in and perform an audit of all your current oils and lubricants, provide a cross reference of these, and make suggestions on consolidating to minimize carrying so many varieties. You may be able to reduce your inventories considerably!
Tip #4  Minimize the invasive problems of PM’s. Modify guards to have expanded metal so the working parts can be viewed while running. Paint the expanded metal flat black instead of yellow. This will reduce glare so you can see down into the space more effectively. You can also replace solid guard fronts with clear Lexan or tempered glass allowing you to see inside while running.
Tip #3  Is your PM/PdM system dynamic? It is critical that you review your system on a regular basis, reviewing needed changes to tasks, frequency, etc. To help in the review process, start by reviewing your equipment histories, looking for repairs and breakdowns that repeat often. Then look at your PM and determine if there is a task that should find and prevent this problem. You may need to add or edit the tasks, or change your frequency, to identify the problem sooner to enable you to plan and schedule the repair.
Tip #2  Why change your oils at all? There are filtering technologies in the field now that allow you to hook to the machine and continually filter while the machine is on line, reducing the need to change the oil at all.
Tip #1  Understand first and foremost what Preventive Maintenance is. Many people misuse this term. PM is NOT a rebuild! A rebuild is a rebuild! Preventive maintenance is process of inspection and monitoring of the condition of the equipment to detect impending failures before they occur. Once detected, the corrective measure can be determined, planned and scheduled for repair, thus minimizing the impact to Production.

Updated March 27, 2008

Improving Maintenance Inventory Control - Submit a Tip (Login Required)


Tip #15  Strategic Sourcing is the systematic procurement process that continuously improves and re-evaluates the purchasing activities of a company. It is a form of supply chain management.
Tip #14  Do you have rotating equipment that sits in parts for extended periods (such as critical spares)? Write a PM to have the shafts turned periodically. If left too long in one position, flat spots brinelling will form on the bearings which will start premature deterioration once installed in the machine.
Tip #13  When kitting materials, the time at which you perform the data entry is critical. We all know that emergencies happen Monday through Friday 10:00 am to 2:00 pm. But in the rare case that an emergency does occur in the off hours the tradesman must have the ability to see where the part they need is located. If you kit work orders weeks or days in advance and relieve the perpetual inventory, the burden of tracking the history falls on the tradesman and their computer skills. A better process is to relieve inventory when the part physically is removed from the storeroom operation.
Tip #12  How do I store belts, electric boards, bearings, pumps, gear boxes, etc? A very good place to start could be with your sales person, supplier or distributor. You're paying for a service whether you realize it or not. Why not take advantage of it? Your sales person or supplier visits dozens of other facilities and sees first hand how someone else is storing materials as a best practice. Ask the question "I'm having a problem with this, have you seen it stored better anywhere else?"
Tip #11  What are critical spares and how should we determine them? Critical spares in stores are the security blankets we have to satisfy our need to cover our backsides. Ask a Maintenance or Operations Manager what they want kept in stores and they'll say they want one of everything. That's not reasonable or feasible especially if the goal of the Purchasing Manager is to reduce inventories by 10%! Determining critical spares inventory is a methodology of using scientific analysis and making a cross-functional non-emotional business decision. Failure Mode & Effects Analysis (FMEA) or Simplified FMEA's are a good place to start the analysis. A cross-functional team should consist of members from Operations, Maintenance, Purchasing, and Engineering. Only when the proper people and tools are utilized can we then make the right choice on what to stock and what not to.
Tip #10  Inventory turns is a good performance measure of how well your material is managed, but it should not be used by itself. Service level is an important measure as it directly relates to downtime (no parts = long repairs), and therefore revenue. Even service level measurement accuracy can be a problem, as they are often under-reported by inventory control and through the maintenance personnel who order material directly thinking the parts are not likely to be available.
Tip #9  If Maintenance is still operating in a reactive manner, then imposing requirements where they must forecast their requirements and ordering material only when it is required may likely result in frequent "show stoppers". It might be more effective to help them wherever it is possible in organization.
Tip #8  How much time is spent physically looking at parts to determine if the stockroom catalog is describing the one that is really needed? Why not include graphics with your computerized catalog description of the part. Hyperlinks can be embedded in the catalog that could connect to an exploded view of the machine being worked on or even the individual part itself. Scanning in graphics or even taking pictures with the digital camera in your phone makes this easy. Time is money. - (Joe McAfee, Marshall Institute)
Tip #7  Since time is money and a large number of items that we need to have on hand cost so little (comparatively speaking) why spend money inventorying quantities and tracking requisitions of penny-ante items (screws, butt-splices, etc.)? Instead a "free issue" area in the stock room could contain the low cost items that constitute over 50% of the line items we stock. All stock room personnel need do is to assure that the bins don’t run out and that unauthorized individuals are not filling their pockets. - (Joe McAfee, Marshall Institute)
Tip #6  Are you keeping your printed circuit boards in their static proof sleeves? These intricate parts must be protected at all times so they function properly when being installed.
Tip #5  HVAC controlled atmosphere is critical to keeping the condition of your parts stable. Do you have bearings rusting on the shelf? Is everything covered in dust? A sealed, HVAC controlled room will help eliminate deterioration and contamination of your parts. Remember, you don’t want defective parts being used during your repairs!
Tip #4  Do you have rotating equipment that sits in parts for extended periods (such as critical spares)? Write a PM to have the shafts turned periodically. If left to long in one position, flat spots will form on the bearings which will start premature deterioration once installed in the machine.
Tip #3  Have you identified your critical spares? Critical spares = Long Lead time (4-6 weeks) X Critical to Production Equipment X High Part Cost. These parts are like life insurance. You hope you never need them, but they better be on the shelf if you do.
Tip #2  Keep key stock in the shaft of your rotating equipment so it is already there when the part is ordered out. This will increase the mechanics effectiveness, not having to stop and order it and hopefully so they will not use the old key stock which is probably worn.
Tip #1  Are your V-Belts hanging on hooks in your parts room indefinitely before use? Over time, these belts will become warped and crack at the hang point. Upon installation, you have just introduced a defective part into your equipment and increased the likelihood of premature failure.

Updated May 19, 2009

General Tips - Submit a Tip (Login Required)


Tip #20  Equipment Improvement teams (EIT) can be critical to increasing the performance of a line or machine. To achieve significant results from your EITs, they must be properly chartered, practice good meeting principles, and be commissioned with a specific goal and timeframe. EITs fail when the goals are too big, unclear, and proper meetings are not run. Avoid these pitfalls and you will see a marked improvement in reliability and performance. - (Greg Folts, Marshall Institute Inc.)
Tip #19  I had just received my new job assignment; I was to replace Jack as facilities maintenance manager. One of the electricians approached me and said, "I just have one question: How are you planning on running this place?" Since Jack had been accustomed to accompanying his employees to the job and telling them exactly how to do every detail of the work, I felt I knew where the electrician was coming from. I responded, "I just have one question for you: How long have you worked here?" "Twenty years!" he responded. "Then I’ll tell you," I said, "if you don’t know how to do your job by now, then I don’t need you…My job is to tell you what needs to be done, why it needs to be done, get you what it takes to do the job, and then get out of your way!" You never saw a bigger smile!The smile represented his delight at the end of management tyranny and the prospect of work freedom and responsibility. When we micro-manage employees, we take away their pride of workmanship, their passion, productivity, motivation, creativity...and the negative list goes on and on. "Severe forms of micromanagement can completely eliminate trust, stifle opportunities for learning and development of interpersonal skills, and even provoke anti-social behavior"(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Micromanagement#Effects).Show trust in your people and let them do the job they were hired to do. Often this show of autonomy and trust will increase productivity, motivation and work enjoyment. From there, the positive domino effect is almost incalculable.Allow that first domino to fall and let your team do the rest.
Tip #18  How can you move from a reactive to a proactive maintenance environment?One element of this answer, although not as simple as it seems, is through structure and organization. A key system for establishing a proactive maintenance department is setting up an effective PM program. The difficulty in establishing an effective PM program is keeping up with PMs when there is so much emergency work.To change your behaviors and ensure that the PMs are completed, your maintenance crew cannot be pulled away from PMs to do corrective or emergency work. One way to alleviate this problem is to create a dedicated PM team/crew that handles PMs only. Now, as fires will still need to be put out you must establish a dedicated "Do it Now" Squad (DIN) to manage all emergency work. The beauty to this organization and structure is that as the PM crew hits their goals, the DIN Squad will have less emergency work to do.Over time, with other elements such as planning and scheduling, this behavior will help to transition a reactive environment to a proactive environment.For more information on this structure, check out our article published in Uptime Magazine.
Tip #17  PM's should have a definitive task to address each failure mode for any given piece of equipment. This definitive task should produce an indication of a minor abnormality before it becomes a full blown problem; this strategy would allow us to prepare a job plan for corrective maintenance before the equipment fails. This type of maintenance will produce the reliability necessary to move a company to World Class and show the contribution of maintenance. - (Hank Bardel, Marshall Institute)
Tip #16  PM Optimization can significantly improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the PM process. We have found 30% of the current PMs are often not value added and can be deleted without affecting equipment uptime. In addition, we also find that PMs can be added that will be value added and improve equipment uptime. - (Greg Folts, Marshall Institute Inc.)
Tip #15  Embed the Improvements….be sure to institutionalize the change by making the measures, goals, and objects of the organization line up with the implementation strategy. - (Greg Folts, Marshall Institute Inc.)
Tip #14  As Kenneth Blanchard author of “The One Minute Manager” said “Feedback is the breakfast of champions”, therefore we must know what we need to improve upon if we hope to succeed. We need to periodically survey our partners to get an objective view of how we are meeting the company’s needs, a sort of “Customer Satisfaction” survey that we can use to address the needs of those we work with. This is an indispensable part of a continuous improvement program. Remember if we say we’re doing our best, we won’t do any better! - (Joe McAfee, Marshall Institute)
Tip #13  Work with your oil vendor to minimize the types of oils used in the plant. Once common hydraulic, way lube, gear oil etc. types are identified, adopt a standardized number, color coding and symbol (some people are color blind) for the oil types. Mark the supply (tanks, drums or pipes) and the corresponding lube points on the equipment with color and symbol. - (Greg Folts, Marshall Institute Inc.)
Tip #12  Ensure that all staff and contractors have sufficient quality training with regards to using and populating your CMMS system and records kept to identify training gaps. Also ensure that the Asset register is continually kept up to date and has an owner identified and your Planned Maintenance/Condition based monitoring are reviewed yearly so that effective maintenance is carried out on equipment. - (John Hay, Marshall Institute)
Tip #11  Communication is a key element of troubleshooting. Begin by understanding the normal operation of the application. Then understand the specific problem. Sometimes the best source for this information is the people who operate the equipment on a routine basis. Make communication with process or equipment operators part of your troubleshooting process.
Tip #10  A carbon resistor has overheated and failed. It is burnt so severely that you cannot identify the color bands and cannot determine its original value. There is no schematic or parts list. How can you determine this resistor’s value? Answer - Carbon resistor failure often involves opening of the device somewhere near the center. Remove the resistor from the circuit. Apply pressure near the center of the resistor using a screwdriver blade. This should cause the resistor to physically break into two sections. Measure the resistance between the lead and the break point of each half. Add the two values together. This should provide a good approximate value for a replacement resistor.
Tip #9  When specifying a variable frequency drive; do not choose capacity based on horsepower alone. Some applications have unique current/time peculiarities. Using a drive that was sized based on horsepower alone can result in over current trip-out of the drive. Always consider the worst case current/time requirements of the application.
Tip #8  Low DC Bus voltage on a variable frequency drive can indicate deterioration of the capacitors in the filter section. Know the correct DC Bus voltage for your drives. The typical DC Bus Voltage should be between 1.35 and 1.4 times the incoming AC voltage. Check the drive’s instruction manual for the drive manufacturers’ recommended DC Bus voltage.
Tip #7  Diodes have two basic failure modes. They become shorted or open. Don’t use failure mode strictly for determining a diode’s condition. Also use it to determine why the diode failed. Shorted diodes often result from too much current flow. Open diodes often result from a voltage spike. Understanding the cause of diode failure could help in preventing future failures.
Tip #6  Electrical safety gloves have a rating that is based on “use voltage” and “test voltage”. Some regulatory agencies do not recognize the lower rated “class 00” gloves. Check to make sure that the gloves that you use meet all regulatory requirements that apply to your location and industry.
Tip #5  Incorrect use of electrical/electronic test equipment can initiate an arc flash. One particular example involves voltage testers that are often referred to as “plunger” or “solenoid” type voltage testers. Many of these devices have a duty cycle limitation that allows for a maximum use of only 15 seconds at a time. Extended use can possibly result in overheating and failure of the tester. Failure of the tester could cause arcing and result in an arc flash.
Tip #4  Traditional safety practices historically taught us to keep one hand in our pocket when taking electrical measurements. This practice comes from an outdated era when electrical safety gloves were not mandated. The intent was to keep a worker from placing both hands onto a live circuit. The most severe electrical shocks can be those that pass through the heart or the brain. While today’s requirement for the use of safety gloves makes this practice mostly impractical, there is a lesson point to be gained from the old pocket practice. Be aware of your surroundings when doing live electrical work. Look for situations that would cause any part of your body to contact live electrical circuits or the equipment frame. Consider how noises or vehicle traffic could startle you and cause you to touch the wrong surface.
Tip #3  Standard IEC 1010, provides a method of rating and identifying the transient over voltage-withstand ability for some electrical/electronic test equipment. Responsible electrical test equipment manufactures design, test and identify their products in accordance with this standard. Test equipment meeting this standard will be identified with a “Cat” (environment) rating of 1 through 4. OSHA standard 1910.334 (c) (3) requires that test instruments and their accessories be rated for the “environment” in which they will be used. Understand the Cat ratings of electrical/electronic test equipment and use the right tool for the job.
Tip #2  Matters of electrical safety are only as good as the weakest link. Workplace safety standards require training that is intended to keep personnel from being the weak link. Understand the equipment that you are working with and seek training that keeps you from being the weak link.
Tip #1  Don't Micro-manage - I had just received my new job assignment; I was to replace Jack as facilities maintenance manager. One of the electricians approached me and said, "I just have one question: How are you planning on running this place?" Since Jack had been accustomed to accompanying his employees to the job and telling them exactly how to do every detail of the work, I felt I knew where the electrician was coming from. I responded, "I just have one question for you: How long have you worked here?" "Twenty years!" he responded. "Then I’ll tell you," I said, "if you don’t know how to do your job by now, then I don’t need you…My job is to tell you what needs to be done, why it needs to be done, get you what it takes to do the job, and then get out of your way!" You never saw a bigger smile - When we micro-manage our employees, we take away their pride of workmanship. Most folks want to be proud of their work. - (Joe McAfee, Marshall Institute)

Updated November 1, 2010


 

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